EX PARTE PROTECTIVE ORDER

Case Dismissed

Case: Crow v. Crow [PO-20-08][Choctaw, OK] and [Cause FM20-00269][Van Zandt]
Result: Dismissed

Oklahoma State Courts Network


Summary:

Haslam represented this father of two young boys where the mother took the children from their Texas home and relocated them to Oklahoma without telling him – in direct violation of a Texas court order she caused to be filed when she filed for divorce in Van Zandt County the day she left Texas. On top of that, once she got to Oklahoma, she filed an ex parte protective order against the father.

Ex parte protective orders are among the most abused legal tools – they permit the filing person to make claims about the other without the other’s presence to defend himself. The Choctaw County Oklahoma judge granted her protective order without a court reporter present to record her allegations.

Haslam urged motions to return the protective order to Texas per the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction Enforcement Act [UCCJEA]. After cross-examining the mother under oath, another Oklahoma judge dismissed the PO against father’s two sons. Thereafter, Haslam proceeded to remove the case back to Texas to argue dismissal of the PO as against the mother before the original Texas judge who entered the order in the mother’s divorce case that prohibited her from leaving the state of Texas or filing ex parte motions: Haslam wanted that Texas judge know exactly what mother had been up to. Not only did the second Oklahoma judge remove it to Texas, he agreed that mother had behaved inappropriately in removing the boys to Oklahoma.

Once in Texas, Haslam promptly arranged for a hearing to once again examine mother about her violations of the Texas divorce court order – this time, before the Texas divorce court judge. Faced with the prospect of admitting her conduct under oath before her Texas divorce court judge, mother dismissed her protective order. Mr. Crow is now well-situated in his divorce – represented by a family lawyer – as the mother is on the record, under oath and an Oklahoma judge signed an order finding mother violated several Texas orders.